Apologies

All fear the mighty computers!!!

We're pretty sure you have noticed that almost all of our posts dating back to when we switched formats for our website have been lost. There was a issue with the backing up of the posts (ask your children if that sentence doesn't make sense) so we apologize if you were looking for a post and couldn't locate it as it is now lost into the mysterious ether that is the internet. Again, we apologize for any inconvenience and trust us, we are sadder than you are about this :(

BUT REMEMBER TO CHECK OUT THE THANKSGIVING DAY DINNER MENU AND RSVP By November 19th :)

Thanksgiving Day Dinner Menu

Dear Residents and Family Members,

Suffield by the River will have a traditional Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday, November, 27th, with only one seating at 2:00 P.M. There are two ways to fill out the form and get it back to Suffield by the River to RSVP for this event to inform us if you or any guests will or will not be joining us for the Thanksgiving Day dinner: 

You can download the menu—> Thanksgiving Day 2014, print it out and return it to the front desk, or you can fill out the electronic form below, which will automatically deliver it back to Suffield by the River. The guest charge is $26.00 per person, and the menu us printed below:

Soup: Butternut Bisque Soup

Salad: Field Green Salad with Apple Cider Vinaigrette

Entrees: Roasted Turkey with Stuffing,

Baked Ham with Maple Glaze,

or Eggplant Lasagna

Starch: Mashed Potatoes,

Greens: Green Bean Casserole

Dessert: Pumpkin or Apple Pie

Kindly return the bottom portion of the attached menu, fill out the electronic form, or email your responses to KBruno@Suffieldbytheriver NO LATER THAN Wednesday, November 19th

We wish you and your family a Happy Thanksgiving :)

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

 Will Be Attending Will Not Be Attending

Number of Guests Attending

1) Default
Input this code: captcha

Caregiver’s Guide to Understanding Dementia Behaviors

Published on Family Caregiver Alliance (https://caregiver.org)

Tips for Communicating with a Person with Dementia

We aren't born knowing how to communicate with a person with dementia—but we can learn. Improving your communication skills will help make caregiving less stressful and will likely improve the quality of your relationship with your loved one. Good communication skills will also enhance your ability to handle the difficult behavior you may encounter as you care for a person with a dementing illness.

  1. Set a positive mood for interaction. Your attitude and body language communicate your feelings and thoughts stronger than your words. Set a positive mood by speaking to your loved one in a pleasant and respectful manner. Use facial expressions, tone of voice and physical touch to help convey your message and show your feelings of affection.
  2. Get the person's attention. Limit distractions and noise—turn off the radio or TV, close the curtains or shut the door, or move to quieter surroundings. Before speaking, make sure you have her attention; address her by name, identify yourself by name and relation, and use non-verbal cues and touch to help keep her focused. If she is seated, get down to her level and maintain eye contact.
  3. State your message clearly. Use simple words and sentences. Speak slowly, distinctly and in a reassuring tone. Refrain from raising your voice higher or louder; instead, pitch your voice lower. If she doesn't understand the first time, use the same wording to repeat your message or question. If she still doesn't understand, wait a few minutes and rephrase the question. Use the names of people and places instead of pronouns or abbreviations.
  4. Ask simple, answerable questions. Ask one question at a time; those with yes or no answers work best. Refrain from asking open-ended ques-tions or giving too many choices. For example, ask, "Would you like to wear your white shirt or your blue shirt?" Better still, show her the choices—visual prompts and cues also help clar-ify your question and can guide her response.
  5. Listen with your ears, eyes and heart. Be patient in waiting for your loved one's reply. If she is struggling for an answer, it's okay to suggest words. Watch for nonverbal cues and body language, and respond appropriately. Always strive to listen for the meaning and feelings that underlie the words.
  6. Break down activities into a series of steps. This makes many tasks much more manageable. You can encourage your loved one to do what he can, gently remind him of steps he tends to forget, and assist with steps he's no longer able to accomplish on his own. Using visual cues, such as showing him with your hand where to place the dinner plate, can be very helpful.

Source URL: https://caregiver.orq/caregivers-guicle-unclerstancling-dementia-beriaviors

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